Nicks point of view (The Great Gatsby)

Nick is the narrator of the book The Great Gatsby. his job for the story is very simple, he is only in this story to right it on paper and to tell the whole world what Gatsby’s life was really like.

In the climax of the story nick is helpless by this point of the story. by this point Daisy’s husband Tom has been already cheating  on her and is not going to change anytime soon. He says he cares for Daisy but doesn’t show it anymore. At the same time Daisy has fallen in love with Gatsby again. Gatsby loves Daisy and would do anything to keep her.

When Gatsby, Daisy, Nick, and Tom are in the hotel you can already tell there is tension in the room. Poor Nick can only sit back and watch it happen. Nick tries everything in his power to stop the arguing but only makes it worse. After they leave there was an accident . everyone thought Gatsby did it but it was Daisy. At the end of the story someone murders Gatsby. Nick hears this and was devastated. He was the only one who showed up to his funeral..

know one really knew who Gatsby really was except for Nick. The only reason why Nick was dragged into this mess was because his cousin was Daisy. He didn’t ask for this but once he was in he couldn’t get out. if you think about it Nick is the only descent person in this story. everyone else was either selfish or they relied on money. Nick is in this story so we can see how corrupt that life style was like.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Great Hope

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is my favorite book and because of that, I have a well known bias towards anything about it. I love the writing style of Fitzgerald-it’s vivid and beautiful without being cliche. But something further than just good writing causes me to love this novel. It’s the core of the story. It’s a story of love and loss, dreams and tragedies. While some people put it aside declaring it too old fashioned or too depressing, I would argue that those are the reasons to keep reading it. It’s set in a different time-one of wildness and wild hope. But just because a story’s set in a different time doesn’t mean it can’t be amazing and applicable to you today.

Gatsby is many things-a dreamer, a rich man, a self-made man. But at the core, he’s a hopeless romantic and someone so full of hope, it’s impossible not to hope with him. He strives for his goal for five years. How many stories do you hear today of a man working five years to attain a goal of one woman who he loves? It’s a romantic notion, but it goes further than that. Gatsby didn’t just hope his love, Daisy, would choose him at some point. He worked towards becoming someone she would choose. He built himself up and strove towards this goal of becoming rich enough and good enough for her and didn’t quit until he reached his goal. He was full of hope, but more than that, he was full of dedication. He was dedicated to her and dedicated to his dream for them. When a lesser man would have given up when Dan Cody’s money went elsewhere, Gatsby found another way. He worked towards everything he got, never gave up hope for his dream, and that’s probably why I love this book so much, is because Gatsby is such a wonderful, powerful character of hope.(323)

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HAWTHORNES SCARLET LETTER

Nathaniel Hawthorn wrote a novel that history considers being one of the greatest American novels, but is this the case? Hawthorn was born during the early 1800s. He was writing during the romantic period and was very popular. A lot of people were amazed on how deep and true his book was. The book that he wrote was called the “Scarlet Letter”.   The book takes place in a early puritan town where everyone knows everyone. Hester (our main character) had a husband but he was lost at sea. She thought he was dead. One night she made a terrible mistake that would change her whole life forever. She slept with a man that she loved but she knew it was wrong. Her secret was not kept for long because she got pregnant. The whole town shamed her and treated her wrongly even though there were probably some puritans who did the same but got away with it.  The story goes on and we get to know Hester’s daughter pearl. She was a devilish child who was shamed as well even though her mother’s sin was not her fault. She had no friends to call her own besides the ones she made.   This whole story is a reminder of the sin that one person did, and how it affected everyone. The Childs father who you find out is the pastor of the town blames himself and hurts himself for it. He carved a letter A (for adulteries) on his chest similar to the one that Hester where’s for a reminder of what she did.  This story may have been set in the romantic period but is less than a love story then a depressing or a novel that is not a happy book you just decide to read. The action of everyone affects how the book turns out. Nothing was keeping Hester their besides the person she still loves. No one knows who the father is besides Hester and the father himself. There could have been many chances to turn this horrible story into a good ending, but that’s not what Hawthorne was going for. He is writing this for everyone who needs to be reminded of the consequences of sin. Even though I don’t enjoy this novel it was one of the first books that dealt with sin and the consequences of it. This book will always be read even though it is not anyone’s favorite novel.

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Useless Optimism

Romanticism sounds like roses, chocolates, and all that other rubbish. But in relation to literature, it means a certain period in time. There are two kinds of Romantic authors, optimists and pessimists. Pessimistic Romantics are the greats, like Poe, while optimists are essentially useless hippies. The prime example is Henry David Thoreau with Walden. Thoreau, in a grand plan to live his life to the fullest, lived rent-free on land belonging to his buddy Emerson, who is also a useless optimist. While living there, Thoreau took baths in the pond, thus he must have smelled quite bad during the frozen months, wrote long, painstakingly dumb paragraphs on a buzzing mosquito, and most of all, sat around and thought about stuff. He wrote an entire book, Walden, about his time there and thus must have felt quite proud of himself for it, for the book is usually printed up around 200 pages. While I am sure there are plenty of people who would enjoy having nothing to do but “sit around and think about stuff”, there are plenty more who realize you can’t truly learn to live by just sitting and thinking about it. Living is about going out and experiencing life, the good, the bad, and the smelly. Part of what makes life worth living is going out and seeing it being lived by others, not holing up on your buddy’s land. It would be an err not to mention that, though Thoreau preached self-reliance and isolation with only nature as your companion, he himself made sure he was close enough that he could go to town and buy everything he may need. So not only was he useless, but he was a useless hypocrite. And this writer is tired of hypocritical, ridiculous authors being heralded as some of the best.(302)

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The American Legacy

What would it be like to explore a brand new place? To go somewhere far away, unlike anywhere you’ve ever been? Would you jump on the chance for a fresh start, a new beginning? These are the questions posed by Captain John Smith in his writings, designed to entice people to come to the new world. He used stories and descriptions of a new place to draw out people’s adventurous spirits, their religious ardor, and drive to better their lives. He wrote about the seemingly endless land up for grabs, about the natives in need of our religion, the plentiful skins to sell, and fish to eat. He also used plenty of exaggeration like any salesman.
There were many draws to the new world. If religion was your thing, there were plenty of missionary opportunities. If you craved adventure, you could go exploring in a new and dangerous world. If you wanted to better yourself and make a new way for your future children, you had no social classes to climb. Even today, we use that call to make America sound great. But how much of any of this do we do?
Our churches take week long mission trips where you only do mission work for a couple hours a day and you spend most of your time traveling. Going on an adventure with your friends is oftentimes just wandering around, bored but happier bored with friends than bored alone. We say you can make your life better, all you have to do is work hard, but to gain a job you must have four years of college and a saddle of student debt to be hired. The pilgrims came over in search of new opportunities, but the Captain didn’t care to tell them how hard it would be. How sickness and death would haunt them like a ghost.
Yet for some reason, they stuck it out. And today, we stick it out. We strive to believe we can do these things, make a difference. Rationally, we shouldn’t. We should have given up long ago. However, we don’t. We fight on, through diseases and wars, through debt and poverty. And we still hunger for all the things our ancestors did. Perhaps the American legacy isn’t freedom or the land of opportunity. Perhaps it is just hope for better things.(388)

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When two (diff) personality’s collide…

The excerpt that we read from “Pygmalion” was hilarious! How the girl whose name was Eliza re-acted every time the professor said something stupid, outrageous or just downright dumb! Watching that scene on a movie that my teacher showed us, made it even more hilarious than it was when we read it on paper! I understood very well that Eliza wanted the professor to teach her how to become a proper lady, but the professor was being a royal jerk for a long while in that scene before he finally decided that he would do it.

I forget who wrote this, but whoever it was, was a genius. Brilliant genius! He/she took lots of humor/comedy, and mixed it with what turned out to be a sweet, love story. I did that with all three of my novels that I wrote in novel way class. That’s a class in which you learn to write the novel way. I did that class three years in a row. One year for each book. Anyways, I mixed in three things: comedy/humor, a sweet love story, and lots of action with suspense. Though there was no action in this story, it was still very good. I enjoyed the excerpt that we read in class.

I really liked how the author made each of the character’s personality’s unique, and funny. I especially liked the professor’s personality, and Eliza’s personality. They were so different that when the two personalities ‘collided’, it was so funny I laughed so hard I was crying sometimes! That one scene out on the street, and then the following scene in the professor’s house are a couple key examples of that ‘collision’. I really just absolutely loved it! I recommend it to those who love a good laugh, and a good love story.

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The Screwtape Letters: A guide to what NOT to do.

The Screwtape letters was a very interesting read. It’s by far one of the most ingenious books I’ve ever read.

The Screwtape Letters is a collection of fictional ‘letters’ written by a demon named Screwtape to his nephew, Wormwood, who is an inexperienced tempter. It is mostly instructional, telling Wormwood how best to tempt his ‘patient’ (The human he’s assigned to) away from God.

Of course, he wouldn’t have to give so much advice if Wormwood wasn’t such a blundering idiot. He manages to mess up royally time and time again through bad circumstance or pure surplus of ignorance.

It was quite an experience to read about Christianity and all that comes with it from the demon point of view. It taught me a lot about how they think, how they lead people astray. I definitely recognized ways that they slip me up a bunch, especially in areas of anger.

I never thought that I’d see so many of my mistakes pointed out by the demon. Oh, if only Screwtape were real – he would be hopping mad that his words were actually a help to Christians! It’s a fantastic work that can do this from the demonic side.

Another thing I find quite interesting about it is that it never shows what Wormwood has said, except by way of Screwtape replying to what he had said in a previous letter. It makes me wonder exactly what kind of a person – well, demon – Wormwood was, how he talked, etc. If C. S. Lewis were still alive, I might very well demand a sequel, the Lost Letters of Wormwood!

All in all, it was one of the most brilliant Christian apologetic works I’ve ever read. I would definitely read this again at a later date, and recommend it to others that might enjoy it, as well.

 

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